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Archives June 2022

Cyberattacks Gain Steam in Early ’22: Tetra Defense Report

Read the original article at https://www.msspalert.com/cybersecurity-research/cyberattacks-gain-steam-in-early-22-tetra-defense-report/

There appears to be no slowing down of cyberattacks during the first quarter of 2022, says Tetra Defense, an Arctic Wolf company, in its quarterly Incident Response Insights report.

The post Cyberattacks Gain Steam in Early ’22: Tetra Defense Report appeared first on MSSP Alert.

Read the original article at https://www.msspalert.com/cybersecurity-research/cyberattacks-gain-steam-in-early-22-tetra-defense-report/

Military Veteran to Lead New York’s Cybersecurity Operation

Read the original article at https://www.msspalert.com/cybersecurity-news/military-veteran-to-lead-new-yorks-cybersecurity-operation/

New York Governor Kathy Hochul taps Colin Ahern to helm the the state’s new Joint Security Operations Center.

The post Military Veteran to Lead New York’s Cybersecurity Operation appeared first on MSSP Alert.

Read the original article at https://www.msspalert.com/cybersecurity-news/military-veteran-to-lead-new-yorks-cybersecurity-operation/

Celebrity Crypto Scams Just Keep on Getting Worse

Read the original article at https://blog.knowbe4.com/celebrity-crypto-scams-just-keep-on-getting-worse

Bloomberg News recently reported that fake celebrity-endorsed crypto scams have doubled in the UK this year, and on average scammed victims out of $14,540 in stolen value before they realize what happened, which is 65% higher than the average crypto scam theft from the previous year. The article’s source expects celebrity-endorsed crypto scams to increase another 87% next year based on current rising trends.

Read the original article at https://blog.knowbe4.com/celebrity-crypto-scams-just-keep-on-getting-worse

AA22-181A: #StopRansomware: MedusaLocker

Read the original article at https://us-cert.cisa.gov/ncas/alerts/aa22-181a

Original release date: June 30, 2022

Summary

Actions to take today to mitigate cyber threats from ransomware:
• Prioritize remediating known exploited vulnerabilities.
• Train users to recognize and report phishing attempts.
• Enable and enforce multifactor authentication.

Note: this joint Cybersecurity Advisory (CSA) is part of an ongoing #StopRansomware effort to publish advisories for network defenders that detail various ransomware variants and ransomware threat actors. These #StopRansomware advisories include recently and historically observed tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTPs) and indicators of compromise (IOCs) to help organizations protect against ransomware. Visit stopransomware.gov to see all #StopRansomware advisories and to learn more about other ransomware threats and no-cost resources.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), the Department of the Treasury, and the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) are releasing this CSA to provide information on MedusaLocker ransomware. Observed as recently as May 2022, MedusaLocker actors predominantly rely on vulnerabilities in Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) to access victims’ networks. The MedusaLocker actors encrypt the victim’s data and leave a ransom note with communication instructions in every folder containing an encrypted file. The note directs victims to provide ransomware payments to a specific Bitcoin wallet address. MedusaLocker appears to operate as a Ransomware-as-a-Service (RaaS) model based on the observed split of ransom payments. Typical RaaS models involve the ransomware developer and various affiliates that deploy the ransomware on victim systems. MedusaLocker ransomware payments appear to be consistently split between the affiliate, who receives 55 to 60 percent of the ransom; and the developer, who receives the remainder. 

Download the PDF version of this report: pdf, 633 kb

Technical Details

MedusaLocker ransomware actors most often gain access to victim devices through vulnerable Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) configurations [T1133]. Actors also frequently use email phishing and spam email campaigns—directly attaching the ransomware to the email—as initial intrusion vectors [T1566].

MedusaLocker ransomware uses a batch file to execute PowerShell script invoke-ReflectivePEInjection [T1059.001]. This script propagates MedusaLocker throughout the network by editing the EnableLinkedConnections value within the infected machine’s registry, which then allows the infected machine to detect attached hosts and networks via Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) and to detect shared storage via Server Message Block (SMB) Protocol. 

MedusaLocker then: 

  • Restarts the LanmanWorkstation service, which allows registry edits to take effect. 
  • Kills the processes of well-known security, accounting, and forensic software. 
  • Restarts the machine in safe mode to avoid detection by security software [T1562.009].
  • Encrypts victim files with the AES-256 encryption algorithm; the resulting key is then encrypted with an RSA-2048 public key [T1486]. 
  • Runs every 60 seconds, encrypting all files except those critical to the functionality of the victim’s machine and those that have the designated encrypted file extension. 
  • Establishes persistence by copying an executable (svhost.exe or svhostt.exe) to the %APPDATA%Roaming directory and scheduling a task to run the ransomware every 15 minutes. 
  • Attempts to prevent standard recovery techniques by deleting local backups, disabling startup recovery options, and deleting shadow copies [T1490].

MedusaLocker actors place a ransom note into every folder containing a file with the victim’s encrypted data. The note outlines how to communicate with the MedusaLocker actors, typically providing victims one or more email address at which the actors can be reached. The size of MedusaLocker ransom demands appears to vary depending on the victim’s financial status as perceived by the actors. 

Indicators of Compromise

Encrypted File Extensions
.1btc .matlock20 .marlock02 .readinstructions
.bec .mylock .jpz.nz .marlock11
.cn .NET1 .key1 .fileslocked
.datalock .NZ .lock .lockfilesUS
.deadfilesgr .tyco .lockdata7 .rs
.faratak .uslockhh .lockfiles .tyco
.fileslock .zoomzoom .perfection .uslockhh
.marlock13 n.exe .Readinstruction .marlock08
.marlock25 nt_lock20 .READINSTRUCTION  
.marlock6 .marlock01 .ReadInstructions  

 

Ransom Note File Names
how_to_ recover_data.html  how_to_recover_data.html.marlock01
instructions.html  READINSTRUCTION.html 
!!!HOW_TO_DECRYPT!!! How_to_recovery.txt
readinstructions.html  readme_to_recover_files
recovery_instructions.html  HOW_TO_RECOVER_DATA.html
recovery_instruction.html  

 

Payment Wallets
14oxnsSc1LZ5M2cPZeQ9rFnXqEvPCnZikc 
1DRxUFhvJjGUdojCzMWSLmwx7Qxn79XbJq 
18wRbb94CjyTGkUp32ZM7krCYCB9MXUq42 
1AbRxRfP6yHePpi7jmDZkS4Mfpm1ZiatH5
1Edcufenw1BB4ni9UadJpQh9LVx9JGtKpP
1DyMbw6R9PbJqfUSDcK5729xQ57yJrE8BC 
184ZcAoxkvimvVZaj8jZFujC7EwR3BKWvf 
14oH2h12LvQ7BYBufcrY5vfKoCq2hTPoev
bc1qy34v0zv6wu0cugea5xjlxagsfwgunwkzc0xcjj
bc1q9jg45a039tn83jk2vhdpranty2y8tnpnrk9k5q
bc1qz3lmcw4k58n79wpzm550r5pkzxc2h8rwmmu6xm
1AereQUh8yjNPs9Wzeg1Le47dsqC8NNaNM
1DeNHM2eTqHp5AszTsUiS4WDHWkGc5UxHf
1HEDP3c3zPwiqUaYuWZ8gBFdAQQSa6sMGw
1HdgQM9bjX7u7vWJnfErY4MWGBQJi5mVWV
1nycdn9ebxht4tpspu4ehpjz9ghxlzipll
12xd6KrWVtgHEJHKPEfXwMVWuFK4k1FCUF
1HZHhdJ6VdwBLCFhdu7kDVZN9pb3BWeUED
1PormUgPR72yv2FRKSVY27U4ekWMKobWjg
14cATAzXwD7CQf35n8Ea5pKJPfhM6jEHak
1PopeZ4LNLanisswLndAJB1QntTF8hpLsD

 

Email Addresses
willyhill1960@tutanota[.]com  unlockfile@cock[.]li
zlo@keem[.]ne  unlockmeplease@airmail[.]cc 
zlo@keemail[.]me  unlockmeplease@protonmail[.]com 
zlo@tfwno[.]gf  willyhill1960@protonmail[.]com 
support@ypsotecs[.]com support@imfoodst[.]com 

 

Email Addresses
traceytevin@protonmail[.]com  support@itwgset[.]com
unlock_file@aol[.]com  support@novibmaker[.]com
unlock_file@outlook[.]com  support@securycasts[.]com 
support@exoprints[.]com rewmiller-1974@protonmail[.]com
support@exorints[.]com  rpd@keemail[.]me
support@fanbridges[.]com  soterissylla@wyseil[.]com 
support@faneridges[.]com support@careersill[.]com 
perfection@bestkoronavirus[.]com  karloskolorado@tutanota[.]com
pool1256@tutanota[.]com  kevynchaz@protonmail[.]com 
rapid@aaathats3as[.]com korona@bestkoronavirus[.]com
rescuer@tutanota[.]com lockPerfection@gmail[.]com
ithelp01@decorous[.]cyou lockperfection@gmail[.]com 
ithelp01@wholeness[.]business mulierfagus@rdhos[.]com
ithelp02@decorous[.]cyou [rescuer]@cock[.]li 
ithelp02@wholness[.]business 107btc@protonmail[.]com 
ithelpresotre@outlook[.]com 33btc@protonmail[.]com 
cmd@jitjat[.]org  777decoder777@protonmail[.]com
coronaviryz@gmail[.]com 777decoder777@tfwno[.]gf
dec_helper@dremno[.]com andrewmiller-1974@protonmail[.]com
dec_helper@excic[.]com  angelomartin-1980@protonmail[.]com
dec_restore@prontonmail[.]com  ballioverus@quocor[.]com
dec_restore1@outlook[.]com beacon@jitjat[.]org
bitcoin@sitesoutheat[.]com  beacon@msgsafe[.]io
briansalgado@protonmail[.]com best666decoder@tutanota[.]com 
bugervongir@outlook[.]com bitcoin@mobtouches[.]com 
best666decoder@protonmail[.]com  encrypt2020@outlook[.]com 
decoder83540@cock[.]li fast-help@inbox[.]lv
decra2019@gmail[.]com  fuc_ktheworld1448@outlook[.]com
diniaminius@winrof[.]com  fucktheworld1448@cock[.]li
dirhelp@keemail[.]me  gartaganisstuffback@gmail[.]com 

 

Email Addresses
emaila.elaich@iav.ac[.]ma gavingonzalez@protonmail[.]com
emd@jitjat[.]org gsupp@onionmail[.]org
encrypt2020@cock[.]li  gsupp@techmail[.]info
best666decoder@protonmail[.]com  helper@atacdi[.]com 
ithelp@decorous[.]cyou helper@buildingwin[.]com 
ithelp@decorous[.]cyoum helprestore@outlook[.]com
ithelp@wholeness[.]business helptorestore@outlook[.]com

 

TOR Addresses
http://gvlay6u4g53rxdi5.onion/6-iSm1B1Ehljh8HYuXGym4Xyu1WdwsR2Av-6tXiw1BImsqoLh7pd207Rl6XYoln7sId 
http://gvlay6u4g53rxdi5.onion/8-grp514hncgblilsjtd32hg6jtbyhlocr5pqjswxfgf2oragnl3pqno6fkqcimqin
http://gvlay6y4g53rxdi5.onion/21-8P4ZLCsMETPaLw9MkSlXJsNZWdHe0rxjt-XmBgZLWlm5ULGFCOJFuVdEymmxysofwu
http://gvlay6u4g53rxdi5.onion/2l-8P4ZLCsMTPaLw9MkSlXJsNZWdHeOrxjtE9lck1MuXPYo29daQys6gomZZXUImN7Z 
http://gvlay6u4g53rxdi5.onion/21-8P4ZLCsMTPaLw9MkSlXJsNZWdHe0rxjt-DcaE9HeHywqSHvdcIwOndCS4PuWASX8g 
http://gvlay6u4g53rxdi5.onion/21-8P4ZLCsMTPaLw9MkSlXJsNZWdHe0rxjt-kB4rQXGKyxGiLyw7YDsMKSBjyfdwcyxo
http://gvlay6u4g53rxdi5.onion/21-8P4ZLCsMTPaLw9MkSlXJsNZWdHe0rxjt-bET6JbB9vEMZ7qYBPqUMCxOQExFx4iOi 
http://gvlay6u4g53rxdi5. onion/8-MO0Q7O97Hgxvm1YbD7OMnimImZJXEWaG-RbH4TvdwVTGQB3X6VOUOP3lgO6YOJEOW
http://gvlay6u4g53rxdi5.onion/8-gRp514hncgb1i1sjtD32hG6jTbUh1ocR-Uola2Fo30KTJvZX0otYZgTh5txmKwUNe 
http://gvlay6u4g53rxdi5.onion/21-E6UQFCEuCn4KvtAh4TonRTpyHqFo6F6L-OWQwD1w1Td7hY7IGUUjxmHMoFSQW6blg 
http://gvlay6u4g53rxdi5.onion/21-E6UQFCEuCn4KvtAh4TonRTpyHqFo6F6L-uGHwkkWCoUtBbZWN50sSS4Ds8RABkrKy 
http://gvlay6u4g53rxdi5.onion/21-E6UQFCEuCn4KvtAh4TonRTpyHqFo6F6L-Tj3PRnQlpHc9OftRVDGAWUulvE80yZbc 
http://gvlay6u4g53rxdi5.onion/8-Ww5sCBhsL8eM4PeAgsfgfa9lrqa81r31-tDQRZCAUe4164X532j9Ky16IBN9StWTH 
http://gvlay6u4g53rxdi5.onion/21-wIq5kK9gGKiTmyups1U6fABj1VnXIYRB-I5xek6PG2EbWlPC7C1rXfsqJBlWlFFfY
qd7pcafncosqfqu3ha6fcx4h6sr7tzwagzpcdcnytiw3b6varaeqv5yd.onion
http://medusacegu2ufmc3kx2kkqicrlcxdettsjcenhjena6uannk5f4ffuyd.onion/leakdata/paigesmusic-leakdata-closed-part1

 

Disclaimer: Many of these observed IP addresses are several years old and have been historically linked to MedusaLocker ransomware. We recommend these IP addresses be investigated or vetted by organizations prior to taking action, such as blocking.

IP Address Last Observed
195.123.246.138 Nov-2021
138.124.186.221 Nov-2021
159.223.0.9 Nov-2021
45.146.164.141 Nov-2021
185.220.101.35 Nov-2021
185.220.100.249 Sep-2021
50.80.219.149 Sep-2021
185.220.101.146 Sep-2021
185.220.101.252 Sep-2021
179.60.150.97 Sep-2021
84.38.189.52 Sep-2021
94.232.43.63 Jul-2021
108.11.30.103 Apr-2021
194.61.55.94 Apr-2021
198.50.233.202 Apr-2021
40.92.90.105 Jan-2021
188.68.216.23 Dec-2020
87.251.75.71 Dec-2020
196.240.57.20 Oct-2020
198.0.198.5 Aug-2020
194.5.220.122 Mar-2020
194.5.250.124 Mar-2020
194.5.220.124 Mar-2020
104.210.72.161 Nov-2019

 

MITRE ATT&CK Techniques

MedusaLocker actors use the ATT&CK techniques listed in Table 1.

Table 1: MedusaLocker Actors ATT&CK Techniques for Enterprise

Initial Access
Technique Title ID Use
External Remote Services T1133 MedusaLocker actors gained access to victim devices through vulnerable RDP configurations.
Phishing T1566 MedusaLocker actors used phishing and spearphishing to obtain access to victims’ networks.
Execution
Technique Title ID Use
Command and Scripting Interpreter: PowerShell

T1059.001

MedusaLocker actors may abuse PowerShell commands and scripts for execution.
Defense Evasion
Technique Title ID Use
Impair Defenses: Safe Mode Boot

T1562.009

MedusaLocker actors may abuse Windows safe mode to disable endpoint defenses. Safe mode starts up the Windows operating system with a limited set of drivers and services.
Impact
Technique Title ID Use
Data Encrypted for Impact T1486 MedusaLocker actors encrypt data on target systems or on large numbers of systems in a network to interrupt availability to system and network resources.
Inhibit System Recovery T1490 MedusaLocker actors may deny access to operating systems containing features that can help fix corrupted systems, such as backup catalog, volume shadow copies, and automatic repair.

 

Mitigations

  • Implement a recovery plan that maintains and retains multiple copies of sensitive or proprietary data and servers in a physically separate, segmented, and secure location (i.e., hard drive, storage device, or the cloud).
  • Implement network segmentation and maintain offline backups of data to ensure limited interruption to the organization.
  • Regularly back up data and password protect backup copies stored offline. Ensure copies of critical data are not accessible for modification or deletion from the system where the data resides.
  • Install, regularly update, and enable real time detection for antivirus software on all hosts.
  • Install updates for operating systems, software, and firmware as soon as possible.
  • Review domain controllers, servers, workstations, and active directories for new and/or unrecognized accounts.
  • Audit user accounts with administrative privileges and configure access controls according to the principle of least privilege. 
  • Disable unused ports.
  • Consider adding an email banner to emails received from outside your organization.
  • Disable hyperlinks in received emails.
  • Enforce multifactor authentication (MFA).
  • Use National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) standards for developing and managing password policies:
    • Use longer passwords consisting of at least 8 characters and no more than 64 characters in length.
    • Store passwords in hashed format using industry-recognized password managers.
    • Add password user “salts” to shared login credentials.
    • Avoid reusing passwords.
    • Implement multiple failed login attempt account lockouts.
    • Disable password “hints”.
    • Refrain from requiring password changes unless there is evidence of password compromise. Note: NIST guidance suggests favoring longer passwords and no longer require regular and frequent password resets. Frequent password resets are more likely to result in users developing password “patterns” cyber criminals can easily decipher.
    • Require administrator credentials to install software.
  • Only use secure networks; avoid using public Wi-Fi networks.
  • Consider installing and using a virtual private network (VPN) to establish secure remote connections.
  • Focus on cybersecurity awareness and training. Regularly provide users with training on information security principles and techniques as well as overall emerging cybersecurity risks and vulnerabilities, such as ransomware and phishing scams.

 
Resources

  • Stopransomware.gov is a whole-of-government approach that gives one central location for ransomware resources and alerts.
  • Resource to mitigate a ransomware attack: CISA-Multi-State Information Sharing and Analysis Center (MS-ISAC) Joint Ransomware Guide
  • No-cost cyber hygiene services: Cyber Hygiene Services and Ransomware Readiness Assessment

Reporting

  • To report an incident and request technical assistance, contact CISA at cisaservicedesk@cisa.dhs.gov or 888-282-0870, or FBI through a local field office. 
  • Financial Institutions must ensure compliance with any applicable Bank Secrecy Act requirements, including suspicious activity reporting obligations. Indicators of compromise (IOCs), such as suspicious email addresses, file names, hashes, domains, and IP addresses, can be provided under Item 44 of the Suspicious Activity Report (SAR) form. For more information on mandatory and voluntary reporting of cyber events via SARs, see FinCEN Advisory FIN-2016-A005, Advisory to Financial Institutions on Cyber-Events and Cyber-Enabled Crime, October 25, 2016; and FinCEN Advisory FIN-2021-A004, Advisory on Ransomware and the Use of the Financial System to Facilitate Ransom Payments, November 8, 2021, which updates FinCEN Advisory FIN-2020-A006.
  • The U.S. Department of State’s Rewards for Justice (RFJ) program offers a reward of up to $10 million for reports of foreign government malicious activity against U.S. critical infrastructure. See the RFJ website for more information and how to report information securely.

Contact Information

To report suspicious or criminal activity related to information found in this Joint Cybersecurity Advisory, contact your local FBI field office at www.fbi.gov/contact-us/field-offices. When available, please include the following information regarding the incident: date, time, and location of the incident; type of activity; number of people affected; type of equipment used for the activity; the name of the submitting company or organization; and a designated point of contact. To report incidents and anomalous activity or to request incident response resources or technical assistance related to this threat, contact CISA at report@cisa.gov.

Revisions

  • June 30, 2022: Initial Version

This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.

Read the original article at https://us-cert.cisa.gov/ncas/alerts/aa22-181a

#StopRansomware: MedusaLocker

Read the original article at https://us-cert.cisa.gov/ncas/current-activity/2022/06/30/stopransomware-medusalocker

Original release date: June 30, 2022

CISA, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Department of the Treasury (Treasury), and the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) have released a joint Cybersecurity Advisory (CSA), #StopRansomware: MedusaLocker, to provide information on MedusaLocker ransomware. MedusaLocker actors target vulnerabilities in Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) to access victims’ networks. Note: this joint #StopRansomware CSA is part of an ongoing #StopRansomware effort to publish advisories for network defenders that detail various ransomware variants and ransomware threat actors.

CISA, FBI, Treasury and FinCEN encourage network defenders to examine their current cybersecurity posture and apply the recommended mitigations in this joint CSA, which include:

  • Prioritize remediating known exploited vulnerabilities.
  • Train users to recognize and report phishing attempts.
  • Enable and enforce multifactor authentication.

See #StopRansomware: MedusaLocker to learn about MedusaLocker actors’ tactics, techniques, and procedures and the recommended mitigations. Additionally, review the U.S. government resource StopRansomware.gov for more guidance on ransomware protection, detection, and response. 

This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy.

Read the original article at https://us-cert.cisa.gov/ncas/current-activity/2022/06/30/stopransomware-medusalocker

Google Cloud Offers Software Supply Chain Security

Read the original article at https://www.msspalert.com/cybersecurity-services-and-products/cloud/google-cloud-offers-software-supply-chain-security/

Are there security risk points in your software supply chain? Google is now sharing its own software supply chain security practices externally — so we all can benefit.

The post Google Cloud Offers Software Supply Chain Security appeared first on MSSP Alert.

Read the original article at https://www.msspalert.com/cybersecurity-services-and-products/cloud/google-cloud-offers-software-supply-chain-security/

Network Defense Platform Provider CyGlass Completes Buyout

Read the original article at https://www.msspalert.com/investments/network-defense-platform-provider-cyglass-completes-management-buyout/

Network defense-as-a-service platform provider CyGlass finalizes a management buyout from the Nominet UK group and will operate independently.

The post Network Defense Platform Provider CyGlass Completes Buyout appeared first on MSSP Alert.

Read the original article at https://www.msspalert.com/investments/network-defense-platform-provider-cyglass-completes-management-buyout/

DOJ Sues Booz Allen Hamilton, Tries to Stop EverWatch Acquisition

Read the original article at https://www.msspalert.com/investments/doj-sues-booz-allen-hamilton-tries-to-stop-everwatch-acquisition/

The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) files a civil antitrust lawsuit to prevent Booz Allen Hamilton from acquiring national security consultancy EverWatch.

The post DOJ Sues Booz Allen Hamilton, Tries to Stop EverWatch Acquisition appeared first on MSSP Alert.

Read the original article at https://www.msspalert.com/investments/doj-sues-booz-allen-hamilton-tries-to-stop-everwatch-acquisition/

[Heads Up] Online Fraud Now Sky-high With 'Tinder Swindler' Romance Scams Costing Hundreds of Millions

Read the original article at https://blog.knowbe4.com/heads-up-online-fraud-now-sky-high-with-tinder-swindler-romance-scams-costing-hundreds-of-millions

A new article in Bloomberg focused on new sky-high online fraud numbers, they are horrendous. Here is a short summary and I recommend you read the whole article.

Read the original article at https://blog.knowbe4.com/heads-up-online-fraud-now-sky-high-with-tinder-swindler-romance-scams-costing-hundreds-of-millions

Evilnum Extends Cyberthreat Target to MS Office Files

Read the original article at https://www.msspalert.com/cybersecurity-news/evilnum-extends-cyberthreat-target-to-ms-office-files/

The advanced persistent threat (APT) actor is infecting MS Office software to deliver its malicious payload to victims’ machines.

The post Evilnum Extends Cyberthreat Target to MS Office Files appeared first on MSSP Alert.

Read the original article at https://www.msspalert.com/cybersecurity-news/evilnum-extends-cyberthreat-target-to-ms-office-files/